The 95th Rifles In America The Experiences Of Two Soldiers During The War Of 1812 Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free


The 95th (Rifles) in America

The 95th (Rifles) in America
Author: Harry Smith, William Surtees
Publisher:
ISBN: 0857061852
Pages: 180
Year: 2010-06
View: 366
Read: 1054

Rifle green to America With Accompanying Histories of the Campaign and Regiment in the Period by Eric Sheppard and William Cope Relations between the British Empire and its former-rebellious-colony in America were understandably strained in the half century following the War of Independence. While the British Army struggled with the Emperor of the French in Spain, open hostility broke out on the new nations border with British Canada. As Britain's war apparently drew to a close in the South of France upon Napoleon's abdication experienced regiments from Wellington's Peninsula Army were detailed to sail across the Atlantic to join the struggle. Among them were elements of the 95th-the famous green-jacketed riflemen. Fortunately for posterity two of those soldiers, Harry Smith and William Surtees, elected to write accounts of their experiences. Leonaur has included these two essential accounts in this volume, together with an account of the doings of the 95th in America and a general overview of the war, to give modern readers an insight into the latter stages of this Napoleonic period war, from a rifleman's perspective, up to and beyond the catastrophic battle before New Orleans that concluded hostilities. Available in soft cover and hard cover with dust jacket.

Citizen Soldiers in the War of 1812

Citizen Soldiers in the War of 1812
Author: C. Edward Skeen
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 081314955X
Pages: 224
Year: 2015-01-13
View: 474
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Winner of the Army Historical Foundation Book Award During the War of 1812, state militias were intended to be the primary fighting force. Unfortunately, while militiamen showed willingness to fight, they were untrained, undisciplined, and ill-equipped. These raw volunteers had no muskets, and many did not know how to use the weapons once they had been issued. Though established by the Constitution, state militias found themselves wholly unprepared for war. The federal government was empowered to use these militias to "execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions;" but in a system of divided responsibility, it was the states' job to appoint officers and to train the soldiers. Edward Skeen reveals states' responses to federal requests for troops and provides in-depth descriptions of the conditions, morale, and experiences of the militia in camp and in battle. Skeen documents the failures and successes of the militias, concluding that the key lay in strong leadership. He also explores public perception of the force, both before and after the war, and examines how the militias changed in response to their performance in the War of 1812. After that time, the federal government increasingly neglected the militias in favor of a regular professional army.

Twenty-five years in the Rifle brigade

Twenty-five years in the Rifle brigade
Author: William Surtees
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1833
View: 1080
Read: 389

Anticipating Total War

Anticipating Total War
Author: Manfred F. Boemeke, Roger Chickering, Stig Förster
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521622948
Pages: 496
Year: 1999-03-28
View: 1065
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The essays in Anticipating Total War explore the discourse on war in Germany and the United States between 1871 and 1914. The concept of "total war" provides the analytical focus. The essays reveal vigorous discussions of warfare in several forums among soldiers, statesmen, women's groups, and educators on both sides of the Atlantic. Predictions of long, cataclysmic wars were not uncommon in these discussions, while the involvement of German and American soldiers in colonial warfare suggested that future combat would not spare civilians. Despite these "anticipations of total war," virtually no one realized the practical implications in planning for war in the early twentieth century.

Virginia in the War of 1812

Virginia in the War of 1812
Author: Christopher M. Bonin
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476633304
Pages: 185
Year: 2018-07-26
View: 1078
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Virginia saw significant action during the War of 1812, from the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair to the defense of Norfolk against British invaders. Many Virginians supported the struggle for independence from Great Britain—others vehemently opposed “Mr. Madison’s War.” A largely forgotten conflict, the war played an important role in the history of the United States. While comprehensive histories of the war are few, there is a positive lack of state-focused studies. Drawing on extensive primary and secondary sources, the author provides an in-depth portrait of the “Old Dominion” at war in the early years of the nation’s history.

For Cause and Comrades

For Cause and Comrades
Author: James M. McPherson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199741050
Pages: 256
Year: 1997-04-03
View: 1075
Read: 257

General John A. Wickham, commander of the famous 101st Airborne Division in the 1970s and subsequently Army Chief of Staff, once visited Antietam battlefield. Gazing at Bloody Lane where, in 1862, several Union assaults were brutally repulsed before they finally broke through, he marveled, "You couldn't get American soldiers today to make an attack like that." Why did those men risk certain death, over and over again, through countless bloody battles and four long, awful years ? Why did the conventional wisdom -- that soldiers become increasingly cynical and disillusioned as war progresses -- not hold true in the Civil War? It is to this question--why did they fight--that James McPherson, America's preeminent Civil War historian, now turns his attention. He shows that, contrary to what many scholars believe, the soldiers of the Civil War remained powerfully convinced of the ideals for which they fought throughout the conflict. Motivated by duty and honor, and often by religious faith, these men wrote frequently of their firm belief in the cause for which they fought: the principles of liberty, freedom, justice, and patriotism. Soldiers on both sides harkened back to the Founding Fathers, and the ideals of the American Revolution. They fought to defend their country, either the Union--"the best Government ever made"--or the Confederate states, where their very homes and families were under siege. And they fought to defend their honor and manhood. "I should not lik to go home with the name of a couhard," one Massachusetts private wrote, and another private from Ohio said, "My wife would sooner hear of my death than my disgrace." Even after three years of bloody battles, more than half of the Union soldiers reenlisted voluntarily. "While duty calls me here and my country demands my services I should be willing to make the sacrifice," one man wrote to his protesting parents. And another soldier said simply, "I still love my country." McPherson draws on more than 25,000 letters and nearly 250 private diaries from men on both sides. Civil War soldiers were among the most literate soldiers in history, and most of them wrote home frequently, as it was the only way for them to keep in touch with homes that many of them had left for the first time in their lives. Significantly, their letters were also uncensored by military authorities, and are uniquely frank in their criticism and detailed in their reports of marches and battles, relations between officers and men, political debates, and morale. For Cause and Comrades lets these soldiers tell their own stories in their own words to create an account that is both deeply moving and far truer than most books on war. Battle Cry of Freedom, McPherson's Pulitzer Prize-winning account of the Civil War, was a national bestseller that Hugh Brogan, in The New York Times, called "history writing of the highest order." For Cause and Comrades deserves similar accolades, as McPherson's masterful prose and the soldiers' own words combine to create both an important book on an often-overlooked aspect of our bloody Civil War, and a powerfully moving account of the men who fought it.

Providing for the Casualties of War

Providing for the Casualties of War
Author: Bernard D. Rostker
Publisher: Rand Corporation
ISBN: 0833078194
Pages: 324
Year: 2013-04-29
View: 1141
Read: 929

War has always been a dangerous business, bringing injury, wounds, and death, and--until recently--often disease. What has changed over time, most dramatically in the last 150 or so years, is the care these casualties receive and who provides it. This book looks at the history of how humanity has cared for its war casualties and veterans, from ancient times through the aftermath of World War II.

American Military Heritage

American Military Heritage
Author:
Publisher: Government Printing Office
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1971
View: 501
Read: 1104

The American Sharpe

The American Sharpe
Author: Gareth Glover
Publisher:
ISBN: 1473884187
Pages: 272
Year: 2016-10-30
View: 735
Read: 979

Sharpe and his adventures has made the 95th Foot renowned again and the discovery of an unpublished diary by an American from Charleston South Carolina who served, despite his father’s objections, as an officer in this elite regiment has caused great excitement. James Penman Gairdner was born in Charleston, South Carolina, but he was sent back to the ‘Old Country’ for his education, receiving his schooling at Harrow. After school, rather than joining his father’s merchant business he decided to become a soldier, receiving a commission in the famous 95th Rifles. He subsequently served, without a break, from the siege of Ciudad Rodrigo in January 1812 until the end of the war in 1814. He then fought in the Waterloo campaign and formed part of the Army of Occupation. He was wounded on three occasions. Throughout his service he kept a journal, which he managed to maintain on almost a daily basis. This journal, along with a number of letters that he wrote to his family, have been edited by renowned historian Gareth Glover and are presented here to the public for the first time. Readers will not find dramatic stories of great battles or adventurous escapades. Instead, Gairdner, details the everyday life of one of Wellington’s soldiers; one of marches and billets, of the weather, the places and the people of the Iberian Peninsula and of Paris and Occupied France – the real nature of soldering. His diaries also highlight the very strange relationship between these newly independent Americans and the ‘Old Country’ they had so recently fought with; which even allowed for a true American boy to fight in the British Army, but not in America!

American Courage, American Carnage: 7th Infantry Chronicles

American Courage, American Carnage: 7th Infantry Chronicles
Author: John C. McManus
Publisher: Forge Books
ISBN: 1429953942
Pages: 592
Year: 2009-06-09
View: 910
Read: 898

Only one U.S. Army regiment, the 7th Infantry, has served in every war from 1812 through the present day. In The 7th Infantry Regiment: Combat in an Age of Terror, heralded military historian John C. McManus told the dramatic story of the 7th Infantry Regiment's modern combat experiences, from Korea through Iraq. Now, in this compelling prequel, McManus relates the rest of the 7th's amazing, and previously untold, story from the Battle of New Orleans through the end of World War II. No American unit has earned more battle streamers and few can boast more Medal of Honor winners. In the months leading up to the War of 1812, Congress authorized the creation of this regiment. It fought with distinction at the Battle of New Orleans, anchoring General Andrew Jackson's main defensive line, forever earning the nickname "Cottonbalers" because the soldiers of the 7th were said to have battled the British from behind large rows of cotton bales. From now on, whenever Americans went to war, the Cottonbalers would always find themselves in the center of the action, where the danger was greatest. Between these covers is the whole story, told through the eyes of the soldiers--the realities of combat expressed in raw human terms. From the marshy grounds of the Chalmette plantation in New Orleans to the daunting heights of Chapultepec in Mexico City; from the bloody horror of the long, stone wall at Fredericksburg to the deadly crossfire of the Wheatfield at Gettysburg, from the shocking gore of Custer's massacre at Little Bighorn to the desperation of dusty frontier battles; from the foggy hills of Santiago in Cuba to the muddy, pockmarked no man's land of Belleau Wood in France; from the invasion of North Africa to Sicily, Anzio, southern France, the Vosges Mountains, the breaching of the Rhine, and the 7th's triumphant capture of Hitler's mountain home at Berchtesgaden in May, 1945, this remarkable book chronicles multiple generations of Cottonbalers who have fought and bled for their country. American Courage, American Carnage is an inside look at the drama, tragedy, fatigue and pathos of war, from America's early nineteenth century struggles as a fledgling republic to its emergence as a superpower in the twentieth. Based on nearly a decade of archival research, battlefield visits, interviews, and intensive study, and illustrated with copious maps and photographs, this book is a moving, authoritative, tale of Americans in combat. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Tecumseh

Tecumseh
Author: John Sugden
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0805061215
Pages: 492
Year: 1999-04-15
View: 504
Read: 468

A biography of the Shawnee leader describes his vision to unite North American tribes into one Indian nation capable of forcing back the encroaching white settlers

The American Magazine

The American Magazine
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1882
View: 607
Read: 167

The American Sharpe

The American Sharpe
Author: Gareth Glover
Publisher:
ISBN: 1473884187
Pages: 272
Year: 2016-10-30
View: 566
Read: 237

Sharpe and his adventures has made the 95th Foot renowned again and the discovery of an unpublished diary by an American from Charleston South Carolina who served, despite his father’s objections, as an officer in this elite regiment has caused great excitement. James Penman Gairdner was born in Charleston, South Carolina, but he was sent back to the ‘Old Country’ for his education, receiving his schooling at Harrow. After school, rather than joining his father’s merchant business he decided to become a soldier, receiving a commission in the famous 95th Rifles. He subsequently served, without a break, from the siege of Ciudad Rodrigo in January 1812 until the end of the war in 1814. He then fought in the Waterloo campaign and formed part of the Army of Occupation. He was wounded on three occasions. Throughout his service he kept a journal, which he managed to maintain on almost a daily basis. This journal, along with a number of letters that he wrote to his family, have been edited by renowned historian Gareth Glover and are presented here to the public for the first time. Readers will not find dramatic stories of great battles or adventurous escapades. Instead, Gairdner, details the everyday life of one of Wellington’s soldiers; one of marches and billets, of the weather, the places and the people of the Iberian Peninsula and of Paris and Occupied France – the real nature of soldering. His diaries also highlight the very strange relationship between these newly independent Americans and the ‘Old Country’ they had so recently fought with; which even allowed for a true American boy to fight in the British Army, but not in America!

The Staff Ride

The Staff Ride
Author: William G. Robertson
Publisher: Government Printing Office
ISBN: 0160925436
Pages: 34
Year: 2014-12-11
View: 350
Read: 644

Discusses how to plan a staff ride of a battlefield, such as a Civil War battlefield, as part of military training. This brochure demonstrates how a staff ride can be made available to military leaders throughout the Army, not just those in the formal education system.

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