The Teenage Brain A Neuroscientists Survival Guide To Raising Adolescents And Young Adults Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free


The Teenage Brain

The Teenage Brain
Author: Frances E. Jensen, Amy Ellis Nutt
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062067869
Pages: 384
Year: 2015-01-06
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A New York Times Bestseller Renowned neurologist Dr. Frances E. Jensen offers a revolutionary look at the brains of teenagers, dispelling myths and offering practical advice for teens, parents and teachers. Dr. Frances E. Jensen is chair of the department of neurology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. As a mother, teacher, researcher, clinician, and frequent lecturer to parents and teens, she is in a unique position to explain to readers the workings of the teen brain. In The Teenage Brain, Dr. Jensen brings to readers the astonishing findings that previously remained buried in academic journals. The root myth scientists believed for years was that the adolescent brain was essentially an adult one, only with fewer miles on it. Over the last decade, however, the scientific community has learned that the teen years encompass vitally important stages of brain development. Samples of some of the most recent findings include: Teens are better learners than adults because their brain cells more readily "build" memories. But this heightened adaptability can be hijacked by addiction, and the adolescent brain can become addicted more strongly and for a longer duration than the adult brain. Studies show that girls' brains are a full two years more mature than boys' brains in the mid-teens, possibly explaining differences seen in the classroom and in social behavior. Adolescents may not be as resilient to the effects of drugs as we thought. Recent experimental and human studies show that the occasional use of marijuana, for instance, can cause lingering memory problems even days after smoking, and that long-term use of pot impacts later adulthood IQ. Multi-tasking causes divided attention and has been shown to reduce learning ability in the teenage brain. Multi-tasking also has some addictive qualities, which may result in habitual short attention in teenagers. Emotionally stressful situations may impact the adolescent more than it would affect the adult: stress can have permanent effects on mental health and can to lead to higher risk of developing neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Dr. Jensen gathers what we’ve discovered about adolescent brain function, wiring, and capacity and explains the science in the contexts of everyday learning and multitasking, stress and memory, sleep, addiction, and decision-making. In this groundbreaking yet accessible book, these findings also yield practical suggestions that will help adults and teenagers negotiate the mysterious world of adolescent development.

The Teenage Brain

The Teenage Brain
Author: Frances E. Jensen, Amy Ellis Nutt
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 1443406244
Pages: 384
Year: 2015-01-06
View: 607
Read: 235

In this instant New York Times bestseller, now available in paperback, renowned neurologist Dr. Frances E. Jensen offers a revolutionary look at the brains of teenagers, dispelling myths and “offer[ing] support and a way for parents to understand and relate to their own soon-to-be-adult offspring” (Publishers Weekly). Drawing on her research knowledge and clinical experience, this internationally respected neurologist—and mother of two boys—offers a revolutionary look at the adolescent brain, providing remarkable insights that translate into practical advice for both parents and teenagers. Driven by the assumption that brain growth was almost complete by the time a child began kindergarten, scientists believed for many years that the adolescent brain was essentially an adult one—only with fewer miles on it. Over the past decade, however, neurology and neuropsychology research has shown that the teen years encompass vitally important physiological and neurological stages of brain development. Motivated by her experience of parenting two teenage boys, Dr. Jensen gathers what we’ve discovered about adolescent brain functioning, wiring and capacity and, in this groundbreaking, accessible book, explains how these eye-opening findings not only dispel commonly held myths about the teenage years, but also yield practical suggestions that will help adults and teenagers negotiate the mysterious and magical world of adolescence. With insights drawn from her years as a parent, clinician and researcher, Dr. Jensen explores adolescent brains at work in learning and multitasking, stress and memory, sleep, addiction and decision-making. The Teenage Brain explains why teenagers are not as resilient to the effects of drugs as we previously thought; reveals how multitasking impacts learning ability and concentration; and examines the consequences of emotionally stressful situations on mental health during and beyond adolescence. Rigorous yet accessible, warm yet direct, The Teenage Brain sheds light on the brains—and behaviors—of adolescents and young adults, and analyzes this knowledge to share specific ways in which parents, educators and even the legal system can help them navigate their way more smoothly into adulthood in our ever challenging world.

The Teenage Brain

The Teenage Brain
Author: Frances Jensen, Amy Nutt
Publisher: Collins
ISBN: 1443406236
Pages: 384
Year: 2016-01-26
View: 1275
Read: 258

In this instant New York Times bestseller, now available in paperback, renowned neurologist Dr. Frances E. Jensen offers a revolutionary look at the brains of teenagers, dispelling myths and “offer[ing] support and a way for parents to understand and relate to their own soon-to-be-adult offspring” (Publishers Weekly). Drawing on her research knowledge and clinical experience, this internationally respected neurologist—and mother of two boys—offers a revolutionary look at the adolescent brain, providing remarkable insights that translate into practical advice for both parents and teenagers. Driven by the assumption that brain growth was almost complete by the time a child began kindergarten, scientists believed for many years that the adolescent brain was essentially an adult one—only with fewer miles on it. Over the past decade, however, neurology and neuropsychology research has shown that the teen years encompass vitally important physiological and neurological stages of brain development. Motivated by her experience of parenting two teenage boys, Dr. Jensen gathers what we’ve discovered about adolescent brain functioning, wiring and capacity and, in this groundbreaking, accessible book, explains how these eye-opening findings not only dispel commonly held myths about the teenage years, but also yield practical suggestions that will help adults and teenagers negotiate the mysterious and magical world of adolescence. With insights drawn from her years as a parent, clinician and researcher, Dr. Jensen explores adolescent brains at work in learning and multitasking, stress and memory, sleep, addiction and decision-making. The Teenage Brain explains why teenagers are not as resilient to the effects of drugs as we previously thought; reveals how multitasking impacts learning ability and concentration; and examines the consequences of emotionally stressful situations on mental health during and beyond adolescence. Rigorous yet accessible, warm yet direct, The Teenage Brain sheds light on the brains—and behaviors—of adolescents and young adults, and analyzes this knowledge to share specific ways in which parents, educators and even the legal system can help them navigate their way more smoothly into adulthood in our ever challenging world.

Summary & Study Guide - The Teenage Brain

Summary & Study Guide - The Teenage Brain
Author: Lee Tang
Publisher: LMT Press via PublishDrive
ISBN: 1988970067
Pages: 80
Year: 2018-03-01
View: 664
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Adolescents Are Not an Alien Species, Just a Misunderstood One The must-read summary of “The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults,” by Frances E. Jensen, MD. This book explores how adolescent brain functions in learning, multitasking, stress, memory, sleep, addiction, and decision making. It explains why teenagers are not as resilient to the effects of drugs as we thought; reveals how multitasking impacts learning ability and concentration, and examines the consequences of stress on mental health during and beyond adolescence. The book dispels many myths about teens and offers practical suggestions for parents, educators, and the legal system to help teenagers navigate their way into adulthood. This book is a must-read for parents, teachers, and others who live or interact, with teens. This guide includes: * Book Summary—The summary helps you understand the key ideas and recommendations. * Online Videos—on-demand replay of public lectures, and seminars on the topics covered in the chapter. Value-added of this guide: * Save time * Understand key concepts * Expand your knowledge

Attack of the Teenage Brain

Attack of the Teenage Brain
Author: John Medina
Publisher: ASCD
ISBN: 1416625526
Pages: 224
Year: 2018-03-12
View: 1021
Read: 826

Marvel at the biological and evolutionary factors that drive teenage behavior and achievement! Thrill to a vision of a better school for the teenage brain!

Inventing Ourselves

Inventing Ourselves
Author: Sarah-Jayne Blakemore
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 1610397320
Pages: 256
Year: 2018-05-15
View: 499
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A tour through the groundbreaking science behind the enigmatic, but crucial, brain developments of adolescence and how those translate into teenage behavior The brain creates every feeling, emotion, and desire we experience, and stores every one of our memories. And yet, until very recently, scientists believed our brains were fully developed from childhood on. Now, thanks to imaging technology that enables us to look inside the living human brain at all ages, we know that this isn't so. Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore, one of the world's leading researchers into adolescent neurology, explains precisely what is going on in the complex and fascinating brains of teenagers--namely that the brain goes on developing and changing right through adolescence--with profound implications for the adults these young people will become. Drawing from cutting-edge research, including her own, Blakemore shows: How an adolescent brain differs from those of children and adults Why problem-free kids can turn into challenging teens What drives the excessive risk-taking and all-consuming relationships common among teenagers And why many mental illnesses--depression, addiction, schizophrenia--present during these formative years Blakemore's discoveries have transformed our understanding of the teenage mind, with consequences for law, education policy and practice, and, most of all, parents.

The Teen Brain

The Teen Brain
Author: Sherre Florence Phillips
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 1438119690
Pages: 130
Year: 2009-01-01
View: 788
Read: 512

Scientists, educators, physicians, and even some parents thought they had a handle on the teen brain. It was assumed that the adolescent brain was fully equipped with all the machinery available to adults, and capable of functioning like an adult. Experts assumed that the adolescent years provided a period of seasoning - lots of trial, error, and yet more trials - in order to improve decision-making skills. However, as any teen can attest, it's just not that simple. Thanks to new brain imaging technology, scientists have discovered that the brain is going through a virtual metamorphosis during adolescence. There is a burst of new growth, circuits are being molded, and patterns of brain activity during decision-making are far from adult-like. The Teen Brain is a revealing look at the substantial new discoveries associated with the development of the adolescent brain and their consequences on teen behavior.

Secrets of the Teenage Brain

Secrets of the Teenage Brain
Author: Sheryl G. Feinstein
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
ISBN: 1620878771
Pages: 202
Year: 2013
View: 1096
Read: 443

Provides instructional strategies teachers can modify to best reach teenage students and includes research explaining the growing adolescent brain.

Age of Opportunity

Age of Opportunity
Author: Laurence Steinberg
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0544253167
Pages: 272
Year: 2014-09-09
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“Simply the best book I have ever read about adolescence. . . With gentle wisdom, Steinberg guides us through truly novel findings on what happens during adolescence and tells us how, as parents and teachers, we should change our ways.” — Martin E. P. Seligman, Ph. D., author of The Optimistic Child “If you need to understand adolescents—whether your own or anyone else’s—you must read this book . . . Steinberg explains why most of our presumptions about adolescence are dead wrong and reveals the truth about this exciting and unnerving stage of life.”—Jennifer Senior, author of All Joy and No Fun Over the past few decades, adolescence has lengthened, and this stage of life now lasts longer than ever. Recent research has shown that the adolescent brain is surprisingly malleable, making it a crucial time of life for determining a person’s future success and happiness. In Age of Opportunity, the world-renowned expert on adolescence Laurence Steinberg draws on this trove of fresh evidence—including his own groundbreaking research—to explain the teenage brain’s capacity for change and to offer new strategies for instilling resilience, self-control, and other beneficial traits. By showing how new discoveries about adolescence must change the way we raise, teach, and treat young people, Steinberg provides a myth-shattering guide for parents, educators, and anyone else who cares about adolescents. “A fascinating book [that] parents and teachers ought to read.”—Atlanta Journal Constitution “This book belongs on the shelf of every parent, teacher, youth worker, counselor, judge—heck, anyone interested in pre-teens and teenagers.”—David Walsh, Ph.D., author of Why Do They Act That Way? A Survival Guide to the Adolescent Brain for You and Your Teen

Brainstorm

Brainstorm
Author: Daniel J. Siegel MD
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 110163152X
Pages: 336
Year: 2014-01-07
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In this New York Times–bestselling book, Dr. Daniel Siegel shows parents how to turn one of the most challenging developmental periods in their children’s lives into one of the most rewarding. Between the ages of twelve and twenty-four, the brain changes in important and, at times, challenging ways. In Brainstorm, Dr. Daniel Siegel busts a number of commonly held myths about adolescence—for example, that it is merely a stage of “immaturity” filled with often “crazy” behavior. According to Siegel, during adolescence we learn vital skills, such as how to leave home and enter the larger world, connect deeply with others, and safely experiment and take risks. Drawing on important new research in the field of interpersonal neurobiology, Siegel explores exciting ways in which understanding how the brain functions can improve the lives of adolescents, making their relationships more fulfilling and less lonely and distressing on both sides of the generational divide.

The Brain's Way of Healing

The Brain's Way of Healing
Author: Norman Doidge
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698191439
Pages: 432
Year: 2015-01-27
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The New York Times–bestselling author of The Brain That Changes Itself presents astounding advances in the treatment of brain injury and illness. Now in an updated and expanded paperback edition. Winner of the 2015 Gold Nautilus Award in Science & Cosmology In his groundbreaking work The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge introduced readers to neuroplasticity—the brain’s ability to change its own structure and function in response to activity and mental experience. Now his revolutionary new book shows how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works. The Brain’s Way of Healing describes natural, noninvasive avenues into the brain provided by the energy around us—in light, sound, vibration, and movement—that can awaken the brain’s own healing capacities without producing unpleasant side effects. Doidge explores cases where patients alleviated chronic pain; recovered from debilitating strokes, brain injuries, and learning disorders; overcame attention deficit and learning disorders; and found relief from symptoms of autism, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and cerebral palsy. And we learn how to vastly reduce the risk of dementia, with simple approaches anyone can use. For centuries it was believed that the brain’s complexity prevented recovery from damage or disease. The Brain’s Way of Healing shows that this very sophistication is the source of a unique kind of healing. As he did so lucidly in The Brain That Changes Itself, Doidge uses stories to present cutting-edge science with practical real-world applications, and principles that everyone can apply to improve their brain’s performance and health. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Blame My Brain

Blame My Brain
Author: Nicola Morgan
Publisher:
ISBN: 1406346934
Pages: 208
Year: 2013
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Nicola Morgan's accessible and humourous examination of the ups and downs of the teenage brain deals with powerful emotions, the need for more sleep, the urge to take risks, the difference between genders, the reasons behind addiction and depression, and what lies ahead.

Shadows Bright as Glass

Shadows Bright as Glass
Author: Amy Ellis Nutt
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439150079
Pages: 288
Year: 2011-04-05
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On a sunny fall afternoon in 1988, Jon Sarkin was playing golf when, without a whisper of warning, his life changed forever. As he bent down to pick up his golf ball, something strange and massive happened inside his head; part of his brain seemed to unhinge, to split apart and float away. For an utterly inexplicable reason, a tiny blood vessel, thin as a thread, deep inside the folds of his gray matter had suddenly shifted ever so slightly, rubbing up against his acoustic nerve. Any noise now caused him excruciating pain. After months of seeking treatment to no avail, in desperation Sarkin resorted to radical deep-brain surgery, which seemed to go well until during recovery his brain began to bleed and he suffered a major stroke. When he awoke, he was a different man. Before the stroke, he was a calm, disciplined chiropractor, a happily married husband and father of a newborn son. Now he was transformed into a volatile and wildly exuberant obsessive, seized by a manic desire to create art, devoting virtually all his waking hours to furiously drawing, painting, and writing poems and letters to himself, strangely detached from his wife and child, and unable to return to his normal working life. His sense of self had been shattered, his intellect intact but his way of being drastically altered. His art became a relentless quest for the right words and pictures to unlock the secrets of how to live this strange new life. And what was even stranger was that he remembered his former self. In a beautifully crafted narrative, award-winning journalist and Pulitzer Prize finalist Amy Ellis Nutt interweaves Sarkin’s remarkable story with a fascinating tour of the history of and latest findings in neuroscience and evolution that illuminate how the brain produces, from its web of billions of neurons and chaos of liquid electrical pulses, the richness of human experience that makes us who we are. Nutt brings vividly to life pivotal moments of discovery in neuroscience, from the shocking “rebirth” of a young girl hanged in 1650 to the first autopsy of an autistic savant’s brain, and the extraordinary true stories of people whose personalities and cognitive abilities were dramatically altered by brain trauma, often in shocking ways. Probing recent revelations about the workings of creativity in the brain and the role of art in the evolution of human intelligence, she reveals how Jon Sarkin’s obsessive need to create mirrors the earliest function of art in the brain. Introducing major findings about how our sense of self transcends the bounds of our own bodies, she explores how it is that the brain generates an individual “self” and how, if damage to our brains can so alter who we are, we can nonetheless be said to have a soul. For Jon Sarkin, with his personality and sense of self permanently altered, making art became his bridge back to life, a means of reassembling from the shards of his former self a new man who could rejoin his family and fashion a viable life. He is now an acclaimed artist who exhibits at some of the country’s most prestigious venues, as well as a devoted husband to his wife, Kim, and father to their three children. At once wrenching and inspiring, this is a story of the remarkable human capacity to overcome the most daunting obstacles and of the extraordinary workings of the human mind.

Your Kids at Risk

Your Kids at Risk
Author: Meg Meeker
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1621570754
Pages: 252
Year: 2012-11-20
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Sexually transmitted diseases among teens has become a full blown epidemic a national emergency that's killing our kids. In this groundbreaking book Dr. Meeker uncovers the story of this serious epidemic and the pattern of political correctness and marketing hype that has caused this tidal wave of disease.

Why Do They Act that Way?

Why Do They Act that Way?
Author: David Allen Walsh, Nat Bennett
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743260716
Pages: 276
Year: 2004
View: 1074
Read: 470

This practical, accessible, science-based guide explores the natural developmental changes in the teen brain and how they affect behavior--and what parents and teachers can do about the challenging problems that arise as a result.

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